Brand Activation Packaging & Displays

Brand activation. It sounds like someone put all the marketing buzzwords in a bag and drew two out, doesn’t it?

Eye rolls aside, brand activation is an intriguing concept, and one that’s entirely new to marketing as a whole. It’s about making increasing engagement and interaction through an experience, ultimately raising awareness and perception. It sounds like it might be just for new products or brands, but that’s not the case. 

What sets it apart from brand marketing is that brand activation is tied to some sense of change. It’s about revitalization, reinvigorating, bringing life or a sense or something new back. Brand marketing is ongoing promotion; brand activation is a jumpstart. It applies to you whether you’ve been in the business for ages or just starting out. POP Displays for brand activation

Per April5, a brand activation campaign typically includes some elements of: 

  • consumer promotions
  • experiential marketing
  • shopper marketing
  • digital campaigns
  • sampling campaigns

Building a Successful Brand Activation Strategy

The best initiatives are strategic and driven by return on investment (ROI).  Activating your brand should be strategically embedded in your marketing mix, not assigned or done as a standalone project.  This allows your organization to budget appropriately and align objectives with existing measures for success.  You can also use research previously done to sound out a campaign before rollout. 

But this doesn’t mean you should follow existing templates to measure success. As influencer marketing is showing us, it’s not all about sales at the end of the day. Brand activation campaigns generate awareness, brand switching, brand loyalty, and more. It’s more about employing the right tactics to influence behavior, leading to sales. 

Brand Activation Examples

EConsultancy points out a few examples of campaigns which used a variety of channels and touchpoints to connect with customers: 

  • In-store brand activation: Monty the Penguin 
    This campaign featured a wide variety of media, but the in-store activities are what made it blow up. Spaces uses Antarctica as a theme, Oculus Rift-like glasses to create a VR component, a storybook, and more.  Building an in-store experience is our domain–we’re no stranger building displays–and can help create products in line with your vision. 
  • Sampling campaigns: Mountain Dew
    We’ve all avoided eye contact with someone standing on a street corner trying to push tiny samples int our hands. Harrying busy commuters is hardly the kind of awareness you want to build. But Mountain Dew, in their sampling brand activation campaign, opted to go with the flow. They created an experience team that traveled around the country, sharing samples at festivals and popular events. 

These campaigns might not sound like anything overly impressive or amazing. But that’s a great feature of these kinds of campaigns: the innovation lies with the users. These allow brands to use user-generated content for marketing, and they’re the ones who carry it on. 

When you’re ready for some materials in your next brand activation campaign, we’ll be waiting.

Companies Utilize Social Media Networks for Cause Marketing

Cause marketing is nothing new, but it has been increasingly growing in popularity for companies to both give back to the community and to get their names out there.  It is seen as a marketing campaign, but the money used is not just being spent on promotions, it is being used to help others.  This makes cause marketing a truly great idea.

social media networks facebook for cause marketing

A new trend that we are starting to see is companies implementing cause marketing through popular social media networks, such as Facebook and Twitter.  These social media networks connect millions of people across the world quickly and easily.social media networks twitter for cause marketing

Just last month, Target’s “Bullseye Gives” campaign allowed Facebook users to go on Target’s Facebook page and vote for which charity (from a list of ten) that Target will donate $3 million.  Users were allowed to vote once a day, and the amount of money each charity was given was determined by the percentage of votes that they received.  Better yet, each time someone voted, it would show up in their newsfeed for all of their friends to see.  This is a tremendous word-of-mouth tool for praising Target and their acts of social responsibility.  Target’s “Bullseye Gives” campaign resulted in 167,000 Facebook users who came together to vote over 291,000 times.  Now that’s getting their name out there.target bulleye gives cause marketing campaign

Kraft Macaroni and Cheese Share a Little Comfort Cause Marketing Ad CampaignTarget is not the only company that uses social media networks, like Facebook, to broadcast their charitable efforts.  Kraft also did well with their “Share a Little Comfort” campaign.  They offered to donate up to one million boxes of Kraft Macaroni & Cheese to needy families, depending on the number of “statuses” or “tweets” shared by users on Facebook and Twitter.

Using popular social media networks for cause marketing can really help companies get their name out there and give back to the community, but they must be careful as to not come off as spam.  If consumers think that you are just trying to sell more of your product and don’t actually care about the charities, your campaign will be a setback for your branding efforts.  But if you follow in these companies footsteps in finding the perfect mix of social media promotions and charitable donations, you could gain a considerable amount of customer and brand loyalty, while still knowing that you are helping others.<–>